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The Power of the Crowd

Susan Sarandon, a longtime friend of EJUSA, has signed on to EJUSA's petition to end the death penalty!

Films that Matter: Give Up Tomorrow

As a tropical storm beats down on an island in the Philippines, two sisters leave work and never make it home.

Law enforcement see eye to eye on death penalty

A couple of weeks ago EJUSA co-sponsored an event at the National Press Club bringing together members of law enforcement from Europe and the U.S. to talk about the death penalty.

Recommended link: Death row lets families down

This fantastic article, in the British paper The Guardian, is about the families of murder victims that

Pope urges Mexico to respect life, praises abolition of death penalty

Pope Benedict XVI took his meeting with the new Mexican ambassador to the Vatican, Hector Ling Altamirano, as an opportunity to make one of his first clear, direct public statements expressing is opposition of the death penalty. Read about it here: http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0903163.htm.

Abolition Day

March 1st is International Death Penalty Abolition Day, marking the anniversary of the day in 1847 when Michigan became the first English-speaking territory to abolish the death penalty. Many state and local groups plan events around this date, with educational speakers, letter writing, or other actions. Contact your local group to find out if any events are planned, or plan an event yourself! If you don't know of a group in your area, contact us and we'll help you find one.

Why shouldn't we execute terrorists?

Among the top stories recently has been the announcement that the U.S. government will seek the death penalty in trials of six Guantanamo detainees. The news was immediately followed by criticism. Here are some of the arguments against death:

International Court rules U.S. violated international treaty in cases of Mexican nationals

In 1969, the U.S. voluntarily ratified the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. The treaty guarantees diplomats immediate access to their citizens arrested in a foreign country. U.S. embassies routinely rely on it to protect U.S. citizens arrested in the other 164 nations that are now party to the agreement. In return, U.S. law enforcement authorities are obligated to notify appropriate Consular authorities in the U.S. when they arrest foreign nationals.

Mistreatment of Prisoners Is Called Routine in U.S.

Physical and sexual abuse of prisoners, similar to what has been uncovered in Iraq, takes place in American prisons with little public knowledge or concern, according to corrections officials, inmates and human rights advocates.

In Pennsylvania and some other states, inmates are routinely stripped in front of other inmates before being moved to a new prison or a new unit within their prison. In Arizona, male inmates at the Maricopa County jail in Phoenix are made to wear women’s pink underwear as a form of humiliation.

New briefs

Mexico lawsuit: U.S. ignores world court

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