Funding available for groups serving underserved survivors in Michigan

Michigan has opened an application process for organizations to apply for funds (pdf) through the Federal Victims Of Crime Act (VOCA). If you are an organization in Michigan that works with underserved victims, you may be eligible to apply through this RFP process. The grant awards are between $50,000 and $1 million.

The funding will focus on three areas: on underserved survivors including, but not limited to people of color, elderly, male survivors, black males; Native American Tribal victims assistance services, and transitional supportive housing. Projects must meet an unmet community need.

The deadline is quickly approaching. Applications are due by July 27, 2017. Organizations must register in Michigan’s E-grams system by July 20th.

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Funding available for groups serving Native American Populations in California

California has opened an application process for organizations to apply for funds through the Federal Victims Of Crime Act (VOCA). If you are a Native American tribe, tribal nonprofit/community-based organization, or tribal consortium operating within a Tribal Court system in California, you may be eligible to apply through this RFP process.

The maximum grant award is $200,000.

Through our VOCA Funding Toolkit, and assistance from our Grassroots Capacity Building Specialist, EJUSA can help groups determine if they are eligible to apply, answer questions about the process, and provide some technical assistance for your group’s application. Please contact Latrina Kelly-James at latrinakj@ejusa.org or (203) 823-5826 or download the toolkit here.

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When police and community come together | Reimagining Justice This Month

Reimagining Justice This Month highlights stories about effective responses to violence – responses that disrupt cycles of violence, heal trauma, and address structural racism.

Training Day, Trumplandia
While there are many efforts to train police officers, trainings often fail to deeply connect police to the community and their needs. EJUSA’s Police/Community Initiative is highlighted in this piece as doing just that: “The officers and community members sit together, assigned to small groups and tasked with creating poster boards they will present to the class. In magic marker, they write out recommendations for how different institutions — the police department, of course, but also social services and public schools and local leadership — can implement trauma-informed policies and practices.”

Violence victims get help to become own heroes, The Detroit News
A hospital-based trauma violence intervention program, Detroit Life is Valuable Everyday (DLIVE), believes the ideal time to approach violence victims about changing their lives is when they’re hospitalized, and thinking about how they got there. EJUSA has been working with DLIVE to grow their capacity so they can apply for federal funding to expand their program.

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Funding available for groups serving survivors in Michigan

Michigan has opened an application process for organizations to apply for funds through the Federal Victims Of Crime Act (VOCA).

Michigan is accepting targeted victim services proposals that identify as underserved or unserved crime victims from six purpose areas including trauma recovery centers; human trafficking intervention services; sexual assault intervention services such as core comprehensive sexual assault nurse examiners/sexual assault response teams; victims of child physical and/or sexual abuse; American Indian tribal victim assistance and elder abuse services.

The deadline is June 8, 2017.

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Meet Pastor Gwendolyn Cook, a fearless victim advocate for girls | NCVRW2017 profile

pastor cook and youthImagine surviving human trafficking, sexual abuse, assault, domestic violence, and gang exploitation all before the age of 13. Pastor Gwendolyn Cook sees it every day. She is the founder and director of Women Walking in the Spirit (WWITS) Girls Mentoring Program in Camden, NJ. Her organization works with young girls returning from juvenile detention at Hayes Secure Care Facility for Girls in Bordentown, NJ. The girls have survived severe and often multiple forms of trauma.

I’ve worked with Pastor Cook for over a year, helping WWITS to frame a narrative for their work and building a program model so they can gain new funding sources. WWITS is one of dozens of grassroots organizations across the country that I’ve had the honor to support over the last year and a half. These groups are providing healing for communities wrecked by violence, victimization, and trauma. I help them build capacity to access and maintain federal Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) funding, preparing them for long-term success and creating more resources for healing. I am most inspired by the many groups who work with little to no funding, with volunteers as the lifeline — groups like Pastor Cook’s.

This profile is part of EJUSA’s series on National Crime Victims Rights Week.

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Funding available for groups serving survivors in Florida

Florida has opened an application process for organizations to apply for funds (pdf)  through the Federal Victims Of Crime Act (VOCA). If you are an organization in Florida that works with crime survivors, you may be eligible to apply through this RFP process.

Through our VOCA Funding Toolkit, and assistance from our Grassroots Capacity Building Specialist, EJUSA can help groups determine if they are eligible, answer questions about the process, and provide some support for your group’s application. Please contact Latrina Kelly-James at latrinakj@ejusa.org or (203) 823-5826 or download the toolkit here.

Full information about Pennsylvania RFP process:
http://myfloridalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/WF/MNOS-AGVJ42/$file/VOCANoticeofAvailability.pdf

Note: the deadline is fast approaching February 24, 2017. Organizations must register in Florida’s E-Grants system in order to access the RFP.

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Updated VOCA Toolkit now available

EJUSA has released its updated “Apply for VOCA Funding: A Toolkit for Organizations Working with Crime Survivors in Communities of Color and Other Underserved Communities.” This revised toolkit reflects the new guidelines released by the federal Office of Victims of Crime (OVC). Many of new guidelines recognize the marginalization of underserved survivors and are a step in the right direction in terms of meeting EJUSA’s goals of brining equity to services for survivors.

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Healing the wounds of violence in Detroit | Profile

Mothers of Murdered Children, DetroitSince its founding more than 5 years ago, Mothers of Murdered Children Detroit (MOMC) has provided support, advocacy, and healing services to mothers and families who have lost loved ones to violence. From helping with funeral arrangements and facilitating grief support groups, to accompanying families to court and helping grieving grandmothers gain legal access of their grandchildren, MOMC is there for families who are trying to rebuild their lives after surviving violence.

EJUSA has been giving technical support to MOMC for several months, helping them build their capacity and prepare to apply for VOCA funding. Grassroots Capacity Building Specialist Latrina Kelly-James helped them organize all of their services and support into a program model, worked with them to create a client tracking system, developed program narratives, and coached the staff on building relationships with local and state resources.

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Funding available for groups serving child sexual abuse survivors in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has opened an application process for organizations to apply for funds (pdf) through the Federal Victims Of Crime Act (VOCA). If you are an organization in Pennsylvania that works with adult and child survivors of child sexual abuse, you may be eligible to apply through this RFP process. The maximum grant award is $50,000.

Through our VOCA Funding Toolkit, and assistance from our Grassroots Capacity Building Specialist, EJUSA can help groups determine if they are eligible, answer questions about the process, and provide some support for your group’s application. Please contact Latrina Kelly-James at latrinakj@ejusa.org or (203) 823-5826 or download the toolkit here.

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The Weight of the [Heart] Work

Heart workEJUSA works with dozens of community groups and grassroots leaders who have dedicated their lives to reducing violence in their communities.

Daily, these groups – many of whom are volunteers – are on the scene when someone is murdered. They help de-escalate situations, act as the liaison between police and families, offer support to grieving loved ones, provide art therapy to young children who’ve been exposed to violence, counsel shooting victims in the hospital, and more. The list goes on. These volunteers are often women of color who’ve lost their own children to violence or former youth detention professionals who mentor children who’ve been victimized.

This is heart work.

But even heart work needs head work – specifically funds to keep the doors open and strategic plans to reach the greatest number of people.

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