Recommended this week

“Recommended this week” features highlights from the past week in news about the death penalty, crime survivors, and trauma-informed responses to crime.

Better by halfThe Marshall Project
An interesting story from The Marshall Project about New York City: “New York City’s example shows that when the community and government work together, it is possible to have both half as much incarceration and twice as much safety.”

Killing Dylann Roof Wouldn’t Help Racial InjusticeTime
Next week, jury selection begins in Dylann Roof’s federal trial. Executing Roof will not rid us of the racism that fueled him and will not make the death penalty less racially biased.

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Recommended: Ta-Nehisi Coates on a possible death sentence in Charleston church

A sign is pictured at a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting, outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston

A sign is pictured at a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting, outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, June 22, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

In June 2015, Dylann Roof allegedly killed nine African Americans in a mass shooting in a black church in Charleston last year. The families of the victims responded to the tragedy with powerful messages of forgiveness. Now, the DOJ has declared it wants to execute Roof for the crime, even though his death by lethal injection will change nothing about the conditions that lead him to violence.

Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a very powerful analysis on DOJ’s announcement to seek the death penalty for Dylann Roof.

Read the full article in The Atlantic

Recommended this week

“Recommended this week” features highlights from the past week in news about the death penalty, crime survivors, and trauma-informed responses to crime.

Meet the red-state conservatives fighting to abolish the death penaltyThe Washington Post
In college, Senator Colby Coash celebrated at a tailgate party outside of a prison during an execution. Now he’s part of the growing conservative movement to end the death penalty in the United States. In an in-depth article about that movement, The Washington Post interviews EJUSA staff members Heather Beaudoin and Marc Hyden, both part of Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty.
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